Research interests:
educational responses to linguistic diversity; linguistic identity; bilingualism; second language teaching

Update: International Symposium on Bilingualism 11 Limerick, Ireland

Posted: June 20th, 2017 | Author: | Filed under: academia, research, Uncategorized | No Comments »

As an update to my post from last week, I have returned from my conference and networking trip to Ireland. Here are a few highlights

  1. I was able to meet with someone from the Study Abroad office and learn about the structure of their education program and international programs. The challenges are similar – their students are in a fixed program and it would take some creative thinking to accommodate an international experience such as Teaching Across Borders (TAB). However, I don’t see this as a stop sign, rather than a time to yield and reflect.
  2. I presented on some initial research on blogging, as a preparation for future research on the use of the Ning blog for reflection during the TAB program.
  3. I networked with several scholars in applied and educational linguistics.
    1. I learned that my research on the linguistic landscape of the classroom is being read by graduate students at a university in Israel.
    2. I reconnected with Aiofe Lenihan, the person who had originally said “You should come to Limerick some day” and learned about her research on Facebook and how it overlaps with mine.
    3. I discussed future research ideas with Francis Hult, who was the external examiner on my dissertation committee and the person who introduced me to nexus analsysis and linguistic landscape analysis.
    4. I learned that Bernard Spolsky is doing a series on language policy management in former colonies. His work on Brazil makes a helpful addition to the body of work that colleagues and I are looking at in our comparative study on conceptualizations of diversity between Canada and Brazil.
  4. On top of all of this, I had a chance to experience Limerick. The conference providers arranged Irish dancers at the Monday evening BBQ, I toured the town and King John’s castle, and enoyed the friendly hospitality of the local people.

It was a full and rewarding trip. I look forward to traveling to Ireland again some day with more time to see the countryside.


Job searched and found

Posted: August 14th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: academia, Ph.D. journey, Uncategorized | No Comments »

One of my first posts to this blog was about my job search:

“Anticipating the completion of my Ph.D. this academic year, I have been responding to job postings for Assistant Professor (Tenure Track) positions. This has involved the creation of a teaching and researching portfolio of quite some length. Online resources such as youtube videos from university HR departments and sample Statements of Research Experience and Statements of Teaching Philosophy have been insightful as to ways others have found of expressing what they do and why, as well as what employers look for and why. None of this replaces in-person mentorship for which I am extremely grateful to several professors who have been willing to read over my writing and provide me with constructive feedback. The job market for professorial positions is competitive and despite preparations for success, one must somehow also prepare for rejection. I am grateful to those university personnel who take the time to update applicants on the status of one’s application.  Wish me luck!” January 16, 2012

Looking back at this post two things stand out:

1. Oh boy, if I had only known how long it would take!

2. Why didn’t I add hyperlinks to make the post more useful to the reader?

In January 2012, I had just begun to write up my PhD research results into a dissertation. I kept myself to a tight timeline and encourage (nagged) my readers to do the same. As a result, I defended in August of that year and crossed the stage in November. With a PhD in the pipeline, I began that fall as a sessional instructor at the University of Calgary. From December 2011 – December 2014, I sent out job applications for any Assistant Professor and Instructor positions within Canada that I felt qualified for, some in German departments, but mostly in Education faculties. I even sent out two Post-Doc applications. The job applications resulted in three interviews. The first was July 2013, 18 months after I had started applying for positions. Receiving this interview taught me that there was no point in applying for general education positions or any that I was only remotely qualified for. It was a position that closely fit my qualifications that netted me attention. The second interview was for my dream job (on paper, didn’t get to find out for real). The experience was also valuable because I was able to visit a university I only knew by reputation, affording me the thrill of meeting some of my heroes, while also casting the institution in a more realistic light. The third interview was the charm. I was offered the position I now hold: Instructor in an education faculty with an administrative position that draws upon my international research experience and ties in nicely with my work in teacher education. Looking back, three years as a sessional instructor seems like a long time, but as I knew even back in 2012, there aren’t enough positions for all of the wonderful people out there who are qualified, interested and worthy. Still, on one hand, while I wish I had spared myself applying for those positions that weren’t a perfect match, on the other hand, I know that each application and interview was a step toward that one that proved successful and the one in which I believe I will be happiest in.

So, to make up for the lack of hyperlinks in the original post, here are some resources and tips based on what I found helpful in my job search as well as my experience on a hiring committee:

1. The cover letter is the most important item in your package. Taylor it to the job advertisement specifically addressing how you fit what they are asking for. All of the other items may just be glanced at, but if you point out one item in your package that is specifically relevant to the job, it will get more attention if you highlight it in your cover letter. For tips on this and all matters academic job related, visit http://theprofessorisin.com/. You can find out why your cover letter sucks and how to stop acting like a grad student.

2. If you are asked to provide a portfolio, put together one document with samples of your best work, rather than a collection of separate documents. I modeled the one I used to land the prestigious university interview after one I found online where someone was applying for tenure. I introduced each section with a brief explanation of what it showed about my skills, relating it back to the job advertisement.

3. Read up (or watch) all you can about academic interviews and take advantage of one of those how to eat properly dinners your university might offer. Going from the free food diet of grad school to the fine dining of (some) academic interviews can quite a challenge. Don’t forget to practice answering those typical academic interview questions out loud! You will be glad you did.

There are a great many tips out there, some useful and some not. Take these for what they are worth and good luck!


Working toward a thesis proposal

Posted: March 23rd, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Now that I have returned from my trips to LA and Europe, I am working toward my thesis proposal by completing projects, reading and later, working on the actual writing.

There are a number of projects that will occupy my time until then. I am continuing with the data collection in my pilot project with a German-English bilingual school. Dr. Tanja Kupisch and I will be continuing our research with young bilinguals with the goal of writing an article together.

The time is drawing closer to the Congress 2010 and the CACS Pre-Conference, so the logistical work requires regular attention. During the Congress, I will be attending the CACS Pre-Conference and parts of the Canadian Association of University Teachers of German (CAUTG) and Canadian Association of Applied Linguistics/Association Canadienne de Linguistic Appliqué (ACLA) conferences. The presentation that I have had accepted for ACLA is based on an article that I am currently revising for submission.


Upcoming Conferences

Posted: December 11th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

February 2010

1st International Heritage Languages Conference, Los Angeles, California organized by the National Heritage Language Research Centre. I will be presenting on Increasing the Effectiveness of Website Promotion for Heritage Language Bilingual School Programs.

Annual Conference of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sprachwissenschaft (DGfS), Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. Dr. Tanja Kupisch (www.tanjakupisch.de) and I will be presenting Why 2L1 may sometimes look like child L2: Effects of input quantity.

August 2010

Traditions and Transitions Conference, Waterloo, Ontario, organized by the Centre for German-Canadian  Studies. My planned presentation is entitled Challenging the Tradition of German Bilingual Programs in Canada: Transitioning to a Dual Immersion Model?